Irish Wolfhound Health Issues
Irish Wolfhounds and health issues: the category looks at the major health issues faced by the breed; studies that have been done on Wolfhounds and research groups investigating the dogs.  The category also details other health issues, some not that common in the breed, that Wolfhounds may face.  Please feel free to contribute to the discussion.

Bloat or Torsion in the Irish Wolfhound PDF Print E-mail
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Irish Wolfhound - Health Issues
Written by Hugh McManus   
Friday, 05 September 2008 08:00

Torsion, also called bloat, in the Irish Wolfhound is extremely serious and can be fatal if not treatment immediately.  The ailment is variously referred to as Gastric Torsion and Gastric Dilatation Volvulus or GDV.

About Gastric Torsion

Gastric torsion is a condition founded in all deep-chested breeds of dogs.   The condition arises when excessive gas build up in the stomach of the hound leads to overstretching of the organ.  The stomach can become twisted in the worst case; in this condition, bloat is more correctly referred to as Gastric Dilatation Volvulus, gas cannot escape but may continue to accumulate leading to a fatality.  In fact, the prognosis for the condition, even if treatment is received is not good.  The mortality rate varies from 10 to 50 percent.  The incidence of death can be reduced sharply with surgery.

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Pneumonia and your Irish Wolfhound PDF Print E-mail
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Irish Wolfhound - Health Issues
Written by Hugh McManus   
Friday, 05 September 2008 08:00

Pneumonia is serious and life-threatening condition in Irish Wolfhounds.  Immediate treatment is recommended.

About Pneumonia

Pneumonia is an illness characterized by an inflammation of the lungs.  The illness has a number of possible origins including bacterial, parasitic or viral infection.  Pneumonia can often result from exposure to other ailments.  For example, Wolfhounds exposed to kennel cough or the distemper virus may, in some cases, develop pneumonia.   These factors don't have to be present.  A Wolfhound can develop pneumonia from other sources.  in Wolfhounds the cause may be idiopathic, that is unknown, and studies are underway to determine how otherwise healthy animals of this breed develop this illness: a point that should be discussed with the attending veterinarian.

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Drugs to avoid for your Irish Wolfhound PDF Print E-mail
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Irish Wolfhound - Health Issues
Written by Hugh McManus   
Friday, 05 September 2008 07:00

All drugs have side effects.  These side effects, adverse events if serious enough, aren't necessarily identical for each person.  When it comes to dogs, there is variety among different breeds.  Wolfhounds have quirks and there are some drugs that should, if possible, be avoided.  Listed below is information taken from various breeders about drugs that might trigger adverse events in the Irish Wolfhound.  As always, it's important–actually critical–to follow the advice of your informed veterinarian.  This list should be viewed as something for information only–a starting point for discussion.

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Lactated Ringer's Solution PDF Print E-mail
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Irish Wolfhound - Health Issues
Written by Hugh McManus   
Friday, 05 September 2008 06:00

Lactated Ringer's Solution is an ionic solution of sodium, potassium, calcium, chloride and lactate that is isotonic (is similar in its ionic strength) with blood.  The solution is administered subcutaneously to irish Wolfhounds, particularly those that are suffering from renal failure.

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Gingival Hyperplasia PDF Print E-mail
Irish Wolfhound - Health Issues
Written by Hugh McManus   
Monday, 01 September 2008 06:00

Gingival Hyperplasia or Gingival Enlargement is an increase in size of the gingiva (the gums).   The enlargement can occur for a variety of reasons but the most common reason is chronic inflammation.   This type of enlargement occurs when the gingiva or gums are exposed to bacterial plaque.  The gums can enlarge to the extent that they completely cover the teeth, particularly the front teeth in the lower jaw. Around 80% of dogs older than about five years of age have some kind of periodontal problem.

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